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Frequently Asked Questions


   Learning Expectations

What specific expectations pertain to all Grades 9 to 12 programs involving work experience?

Answer current as of June 23, 2020

As of June 1, 2020, the High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP), Cooperative Vocational Education (CVE), Credit for Employment (CFE), as well as all other programs/credits involving work experience or practicums, including placements for Career Development Life/Work courses, Career Development Internships (CDI), and the Community Service Student-Initiated Project (CSSIP), are no longer suspended. These programs can resume provided that school divisions ensure they are in alignment with public health guidelines and follow current public health orders (e.g., social distancing, applicable personal protective equipment use, and hygiene-related recommendations). Phase 3 guidelines from the Restoring Safe Services plan are to be followed by students and employers. In some situations, the Restoring Safe Services section “Workplace Guidance for Business Owners” may also be useful.

In these circumstances, it is important for school divisions and funded independent schools to review their safety plan framework for student work experience to ensure proper planning and oversight is in place. For more information on safety plan frameworks for student work experience, see Safety Preparation for Student Work Experience Safety Plan Framework PDF Document document. Students should understand their right to refuse work if they identify hazards in the course of their duties at a workplace. Planning on the resumption of these programs will be a school division decision.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education document Technology Education and Career Development Education.

How will schools address the practical application portion (outcomes/hours) for technical-vocational programming that students missed and will require for accreditation or certification?

Answer current as of June 10, 2020

Students will receive high school credits based on their standing prior to the suspension of classes, including subsequent remote theory and applied learning. Additional practical learning will require gap training for certification once access to facilities is available. School divisions will plan and may collaborate with other school divisions and Manitoba Education for flexible scheduling options.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education document Technology Education and Career Development Education.

Would Apprenticeship Manitoba accept work experience in place of the practical portion of technical training?

Answer current as of June 10, 2020

No. Only accredited facilities can provide the theory and practical trade standard requirements towards Apprenticeship Technical Training. Accreditation is considered equivalent to Level 1 Apprenticeship Technical Training for the trade (theory and practical). The third element to an apprenticeship program is the on-the-job hours. ALL three elements must be completed to be recognized as having completed the Level 1 requirements.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education document Technology Education and Career Development Education.

Does Apprenticeship Manitoba have a time limit for students requiring gap training?

Answer current as of June 10, 2020

In recognition of retention of information and practice, this would ideally be completed within the next school year. Upon completion of the accredited program, the student would fall under the guidelines and existing practices/processes for becoming an apprentice.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education document Technology Education and Career Development Education.

Would students who have completed only the theory portion of programming qualify for a Senior Years Technology Education Program (SYTEP) diploma?

Answer current as of June 10, 2020

All technical-vocational education courses qualify as eligible credits for fulfilling the 8-credit requirement to graduate with a SYTEP diploma, regardless of whether the student’s report card indicates that gap training is required for certification purposes.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education document Technology Education and Career Development Education.

If teachers feel recovery learning/gap training is not required, can accreditation numbers be provided?

Answer current as of June 10, 2020

Yes. As schools are an accredited provider within Apprenticeship Manitoba’s partnership model with our public school system (K–12), by issuing Level 1 Accreditation to students, schools are confirming that they have provided the required theory and practical training to meet the trade’s program standards. There is no separate declaration or submission to confirm. Documentation must be made available upon request to support the broader monitoring/quality assurance of apprenticeship training programs.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education document Technology Education and Career Development Education.

What is recovery learning?

Answer current as of May 29, 2020

Recovery learning is a process to enable Manitoba students to transition back from remote learning to classroom learning in schools, while addressing their mental and physical well-being and academic success. Given the current situation, it is anticipated that when school reopens, there will be a wider than usual range of learning gaps and needs among students that will require additional supports and learning plans.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education Recovery Learning document.

How will teachers indicate on the final report card in June whether students will require recovery learning?

Answer current as of May 27, 2020

Reporting of final grades in June will follow the Manitoba Provincial Report Card Policy and Guidelines. Teacher comments on the report card will identify whether students have acquired the necessary learning to be successful at the next grade level, as well as what, if any, continued learning they may need. Teachers should provide a short summary of outcomes they have addressed in class or online, along with student strengths and areas for growth.

If, at the time of the suspension of in-school learning, a student had completed the theoretical training for an apprenticeship program but had not completed the practical requirements for their apprenticeship certification, does this student receive their Apprenticeship Certification (AC number)?

Answer current as of May 15, 2020

High school credits are separate from external certification programs such as those through Apprenticeship Manitoba. High school credits can be issued without the certification requirements being met and students can graduate with a Senior Years Technology Education Program diploma yet still require gap training to attain certification. Transcripts should not include Apprenticeship Certification (AC) numbers until gap training has been completed.

More information can be found in the Manitoba Education Technology Education and Career Development Education document.

Will schools reopen before the end of the school year?

Answer current as of May 7, 2020

Manitoba Education appreciates all of the work being done by school divisions, teachers, parents, and caregivers to ensure that students have the opportunity to continue learning during this difficult time. Ensuring the safety of our children is our priority. While the suspension of in-class learning continues and schools remain closed to the public, Public Health has advised that limited access to school facilities is permitted where physical distancing can be maintained.

Will students receive learning opportunities during the suspension of in-class instruction?

Answer current as of April 28, 2020

Yes. Families, schools and school divisions, educational partners, and Manitoba Education are working together to ensure student achievement and success, and they are planning for individual student needs and circumstances. Resources are being redirected to ensure that students actively engage in learning during the suspension of in-class instruction.

What are the expectations for students and teachers of all grades while classroom learning is suspended?

Answer current as of May 29, 2020

Students are expected to continue remote learning and complete assigned work. Students will have the opportunity to learn through hands-on activities, print materials, and online platforms.

Students are expected to actively engage in remote learning. Students who are engaged in their learning during this period will have a simpler learning recovery process when they return to school. Their performance will be assessed and reported accordingly, as outlined in the Manitoba Education Recovery Learning document. For students where remote learning is not easily accessible, a learning recovery process will be put in place upon their return to school.

Teachers will facilitate remote learning to support students with online platforms, printed materials, and outreach for students who are at risk. They will continue to set goals for students and assess progress. They will use their professional judgment to determine the format of these assessments.

Beyond delivering daily instructional materials and preparing for assessment, it is expected that teachers will have regular, personal communication with students, parents and caregivers in support of student achievement. This connection will occur by phone, online platforms, email, and/or mail, so that students who may have limited access to technology do not find this to be a barrier to communication.

What are the specific expectations of Kindergarten to Grade 8 students and teachers?

Answer current as of April 28, 2020

Students in Kindergarten to Grade 8 will proceed to the next grade in September with the understanding that they will engage in recovery learning as needed.

It is recommended that teachers plan a minimum average of five hours per week of curriculum-based learning for students in Kindergarten to Grade 4 and 10 hours per week for students in Grades 5 to 8. Teacher-directed learning will focus on literacy and numeracy, with opportunities for science and social studies, physical education and health education, and the arts through cross-curricular planning.

What are the specific expectations of Grades 9 to 12 students and teachers?

Answer current as of April 28, 2020

Students in Grades 9 to 12 will receive, at minimum, the grades they achieved at the time of suspension of classes, with the expectation that they engage in remote learning. This will provide them the opportunity to continue their learning and improve their marks. Students who do not engage in remote learning may be required to undertake recovery learning next school year.

It is recommended that teachers plan for a minimum of three hours of curriculum-based learning per course, per week, for Grades 9 to 12 semestered courses. Teachers will prioritize learning outcomes and expectations, and plan specific curriculum-related tasks for students. Where feasible, teachers of multiple subjects may work together to develop cross-curricular learning experiences.

Teacher-directed learning could consist of existing strategies, print-based learning, online learning, or a blend of methods. Teachers can access web-based courses or print-based distance learning courses to support student learning.