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Research Results

Impact of the IMYM Project on Grade 8 Pilot Teachers: A Follow-up Report

May 2001

Prepared by Distance Learning and Information Technologies Unit, Program Development Branch, Manitoba Education, Citizenship and Youth


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5.0 Teachers' Rubric for Indicators of Pedagogical Skill in Integrating Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) with Curriculum and Classroom Practice

After the pilot of the Systems and Interactions interdisciplinary unit was completed, the Grade 8 IMYM teachers were asked to complete the Teacher's Rubric for Indicators of Pedagogical Skill in Integrating Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) with Curriculum and Classroom Practice. This provided an opportunity for teachers to reflect on their professional growth and on changes in their classroom practice. Teachers were asked to self-assess the competency level of their pedagogical skills in various information and communication technology (ICT) areas including

In each of these ICT areas, pilot teachers selected from a rubric of four competency levels: Beginning, Developing, Accomplished or Exemplary. The following chart illustrates the IMYM8 pilot teacher responses

Teachers' Rubric Chart

Pedagogical Skill (n=22) Beginning Developing Accomplished Exemplary
1. Using Educational Software - 2 (9%) 12 (55%) 8 (36%)
2. Using information and communication technology to improve student writing - 1 (5%) 8 (36%) 13 (59%)
3. Teaching information literacy skills using secondary sources - 11 (50%) 10 (45%) 1 (5%)
4. Teaching information literacy skills using primary sources 5 (23%) 6 (27%) 7 (32%) 4 (18%)
5. Modifying instructional delivery - 2 (9%) 17 (77%) 3 (14%)
6. Assessing student performance 2 (9%) 2 (9%) 15 (68%) 3 (14%)
7. Individualizing instruction 2 (9%) 13 (59%) 7 (32%) -
8. Using adaptive technologies 12 (55%) 3 (14%) 5 (23%) 2 (9%)
9. Using technology for professional learning and communication 2 (9%) 5 (23%) 8 (36%) 7 (32%)
10. Researching and evaluating the use of technology in education - 17 (77%) 3 (14%) 2 (9%)

 

After implementing the IMYM model, IMYM8 teachers clearly believe they are well beyond the "Beginning" Stage in their pedagogical skills in integrating ICT. Over 50% of these teachers rated themselves as either "Accomplished" or "Exemplary" in

  • using educational software
  • using ICT to improve student writing
  • modifying instructional delivery
  • assessing student performance
  • using technology for professional learning and communication

Areas in which IMYM8 teachers felt less competent were

  • teaching information technology literacy skills using primary sources
  • individualizing instruction
  • using adaptive technologies
  • researching and evaluating the use of technology in education

 

Teachers' Rubric for Indicators of Pedagogical Skill in Integrating Information and Communication Technologies in Curriculum and Classroom Practice
Pedagogical Skill Beginning Developing Accomplished Exemplary
1. Using Educational Software I do not use educational software as part of my instruction and I am not aware of any titles that may help my students meeting their learning goals. I use some educational software as an instructional supplement, as a reward, or for children with special needs. I use educational software (such as drill and practice, simulations, tutorials) that have been evaluated as learning resources that match outcomes in Manitoba Foundation for Implementation documents. I use these resources to provide experiences otherwise unavailable to my students. I seek out new educational software for evaluation and adoption. I access sources of software reviews and keep current on developments in educational technologies through professional reading and conference attendance. I share my findings with my colleagues.
2. Using information and communication technology to improve student writing I am not familiar with any technologies that would allow me to help my students improve their writing skills. I use word processing for my own professional work. I ask that the final draft of some student writing assignments be word processed. I do not expect or encourage my students to compose or edit using the computer. I help students use the computer in all phases of the writing process from brainstorming to concept mapping to writing and editing. This includes the use of portable computers, outlining and concept mapping tools, spelling and grammar checkers, and desktop publishing tools. I use technology to help students share their work with a wide reading audience. I store portfolios of my students' work electronically. I share successful strategies with colleagues through print and electronic publishing and through conference presentations and workshops. I look for specific technology tools to help my students improve their writing skills.
3. Teaching information literacy skills using resource-based learning I am not familiar with any technologies that would allow me to help my students improve their writing skills. I use word processing for my own professional work. As a part of my instructional strategies, I have students do library research projects, and I support the library skills taught by the teacher-librarian. I use resource-based learning and I am aware that electronic resources are also available to my students. I team-teach information literacy projects with the teacher-librarian. I understand the Big6 (www.big6.com) or a similar information literacy and inquiry process. I design student projects so that they require higher-level thinking skills, use and cite electronic information sources, require the use of computer productivity software, and are authentically assessed. I am actively involved in curriculum implementation teams and advocate for interdisciplinary units and learning experiences that require information literacy skills and resource-based learning. I share successful units with colleagues through print and electronic publishing and through conference presentations, and workshops.
4. Teaching information literacy skills using primary sources When asking students to do research, I expect them to only use secondary sources such as books, magazines, or reference materials. As part of my instructional strategies I include student projects that require the collection and use of original data. I generally can predict the outcome of such experiments or surveys. I have my students participate in information literacy projects that require the collection of original data to answer a genuine question. They use a variety of tools to collect data, such as computerized probes and sensors, online surveys, interviews, or digitized sources of historical records. I teach my students to use spreadsheets and databases to record, organize, analyze and communicate the results. I am actively involved in curriculum implementation teams and advocate for interdisciplinary units and learning experiences that require information literacy skills and the use of primary sources of data. I share successful strategies with other teachers through print, electronic publishing, conference presentations, and workshops.
5. Modifying instructional delivery I rely on one or two effective methods of delivering content to my students. I do not use technology that requires that I change my instructional methodology. I have tried units or projects that have a technology component, but I primarily use teacher-directed, whole group instruction. Most of my use of technology with students takes place in a computer lab. I use a variety of instructional delivery methods and student grouping strategies routinely throughout the year. I can design learning experiences and approaches that best fit curricular learning outcomes, student learning styles, and the technology available to me. I can use small groups working collaboratively or in rotation too take advantage of student-to-equipment ratios of greater than one-to-one. I have at least 4 computers in my classroom. I continuously try new approaches suggested by research or observation to discover the most effective means of using technology to engage my students and meet curricular outcomes. I work with a team of like-minded teachers either face-to-face or online to create, modify, and improve my practices in instructional delivery.
6. Assessing student performance I evaluate my students' knowledge using objective written tests only. I evaluate some student performances or projects using subjective criteria. I save some student work for cumulative folders and parent conferences. I print copies of electronic work such as word-processed documents, graphics, and presentations for cumulative folders and parent conferences. I use a wide range of assessment strategies to evaluate student projects and performances. I can use technology to help create assessment tools such as checklists, rubrics, and benchmarks that help students assess their own and their peers' performances and allow me to objectively determine the quality of student work. I ask students to keep both a physical and electronic portfolio of their work. I have a computerized means of aggregating performance data for my class that I use to modify my instructional strategies. I continually try new strategies suggested by research or observation to discover the most effective means of using technology to help assess student learning. I work with a team of like-minded teachers, in person or virtually, to create, modify, and improve my assessment practices.
7.Individualizing instruction I modify my instructional strategies only for my students with identified special needs. I occasionally give my students a choice of assignments, but all students in my class (unless they are in a modified program) must achieve the same learning outcomes within the same time frame. I do skill remediation with students during or after school. With the assistance of the student, parents, and specialists, if required, I create a learning plan for each of my students. I track the accomplishment of their learning outcomes in each plan using a computerized tool. I use this tool during parent conferences and for school reporting. I can customize the content and design of the computerized planning and reporting tools that I use. I share my strategies, for using technology to individualize instruction with my colleagues.
8. Using adaptive technologies I am not aware of how technology can help students with physical or mental challenges. I work with students who may bring with them special devices that allow them to work and communicate in the classroom. I use technology when appropriate to help students with special learning needs. This includes detailed IEPs and specialized communications devices. I provide professional learning opportunities for other teachers in the use of adaptive technologies.
9. Using technology for professional learning and communication I do not use information and communication technologies for professional learning or communication. I can find lesson plans and some educational research in online databases. I correspond with parents and other teachers using email. I use the Internet and its online research, teaching materials, and information related to the content of my classes. I read electronic newsletters and journals to keep current on educational practices. I participate in electronic discussion groups and chat rooms related to my area of expertise. I use electronic presentation software when giving workshops or speaking at conferences. I take part in distance learning opportunities using technology. I organize professional learning opportunities for other teachers and feel comfortable teaching colleagues how to use technology to enhance instruction.
10. Researching and evaluating the use of technology in education I have not attempted to determine whether the use of instructional technology has made a difference in my students' learning or in classroom climate. I gather, use, and share with colleagues, anecdotal information and observations about student use of technology in my classroom. I use action research to accurately determine how the technology and methodology I am using affects how my students learn and the climate of my classroom. I use the results of other research to inform my own classroom practice. I participate in formal studies of the effects of technology on student learning conducted by professional groups and academics. I have designed such studies as part of my own professional learning. I report electronically and in print, the findings of my research to other professionals.

*Adapted from Rubrics to Guide Professional Technology Development by Doug Johnson, Learning and Leading with Technology, Volume 28 Number 4, December/January 2000-2001

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