Graduation Requirements

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Students and Parents

General
Until what age must I attend school in Manitoba?

In September 2011, the Manitoba government amended The Public Schools Act, raising the age of compulsory school attendance for a student in Manitoba from 16 to 18 years, or to graduation.

Is community service a graduation requirement?

No, community service is not required for a Manitoba high school diploma.

Can a school or school division make additional requirements beyond the provincial requirements of 30 credits for graduation?

Yes, a school or school division may mandate additional credits or requirements (e.g. community service) for graduation. Students meeting the additional requirements are eligible for the school/school division diploma, in addition to the provincial diploma. Students that do not meet the additional requirements, but do meet the provincial 30 credit requirement are eligible for the Manitoba high school diploma.

I am applying to a post-secondary institution. How can I get a mark transcript?

Contact the high school you attended and request a mark transcript. If you are unable to obtain your mark transcript from the school, contact the Student Records Office in Russell, Manitoba to obtain a Statement of High School Marks.

I graduated last year, but I want to improve some of my marks or take some more courses. Can I go back to school and take courses after graduation?

Yes, students have the option of taking additional credits after high school graduation. Students may be eligible to take up to four additional credits, depending on their age and residency status. Tuition fees may be charged. See your school counsellor for more information.

Diplomas
I failed a course and want to graduate with my friends. How can I make up my missing credit?

There are several ways to earn a missing credit.

  • Summer school provides an opportunity to repeat the course and gain the credit.
  • Your school may have a credit recovery program that provides students with an in-school alternative to achieve learning outcomes previously attempted.
  • You may be able to fit a course into a spare period in your timetable.
  • Your school may approve registration in a course offered through Distance Learning.
  • See your school counsellor for more information.
I left school before graduating. Where can I go to complete my schooling and obtain my high school diploma?

You can return to a high school in your area. Students have the right to attend public school from the beginning of the fall term of that calendar year until they receive a graduation diploma, or until the last school day of June in the calendar year in which they become 21 years of age.

School-age students and adult learners may choose to attend an Adult Learning Centre (ALC). To find an ALC in your area, view the Directory of Certified Adult Literacy Programs & Adult Learning Centres

School-age and adult learners may take Independent Study Option courses through Distance Learning.  For more information visit Distance Learning.

Can I get a high school diploma through General Educational Development (GED)?

No, the GED is not a high school diploma. The GED certifies the holder has a general educational background relative to the average high school graduate. For more information, see GED Testing in Manitoba.

What is the difference between a High School Diploma and a Mature Student Diploma?

The provincial High School Diploma requires the successful completion of 30 compulsory and optional credits across Grades 9 to 12.

The Mature Student Diploma is an alternative route to graduation available to students who meet the mature student eligibility requirements.

I lost my diploma. How do I get it replaced?

High school diplomas are issued by the school from which you graduated. Once issued, a diploma cannot be replaced or reissued.

Alternative Ways to Earn Credits
I speak a language other than English and French. Can I get a credit for my language skills?

Yes, students proficient in languages other than French or English may earn up to four credits through the Special Language Credit Option. See Special Language Credit Option or your school counsellor for more information.

What are dual credits?

Dual credit courses are university or college credit courses students may take while in high school. These credits count as part of the credits required to earn a high school diploma, and can be used towards university or college degree, diploma or certificate programs.

Can I start apprenticeship training while in high school?

Yes, the High School Apprenticeship Program (HSAP) lets students start apprenticeships while still in high school or adult learning centres. See HSAP Brochure (PDF Document 764 KB) or your school counsellor for more information.

I want to take a course that is not offered in my high school. Might it be possible to take it through distance learning?

Yes, distance learning is a way of accessing courses even though students and their teachers, instructors or tutor/markers may be in different geographical locations. For more information, see your school counsellor or visit Distance Learning.

Can I receive a credit for achievement or participation in extracurricular or regular activities of organized community groups?

No, specific examples of the types of extracurricular and community activities that do not qualify for credit are activities such as St. John Ambulance First Aid, CPR, 4H, athletic or artistic training/competition, driver education, coaching, volunteer fire fighting training, volunteer candy-striping, or participation in community cultural or leisure activities.

What are School-initiated Courses?

School-initiated courses (SICs) are courses that have been developed and approved by schools and school divisions to meet local needs and interests of students. For more information, see your school counsellor or visit Locally Developed Curricula: SICs and SIPs.

Can I receive a credit for participating in community or cultural activities?

Yes, a student can earn a maximum of 1 credit for community service using the Community Service Student-initiated Projects (CSSIP) and 1 credit in cultural exploration using the Cultural Exploration Student-initiated Projects (CESIP). For more information, see your school counsellor or visit Locally Developed Curricula: SICs and SIPs.

I completed the Cadet basic training program and the Cadet advanced training program. Can I receive credits for completing the training?

Yes, one credit can be recognized on the successful completion of the Cadet basic training program, and one credit can be recognized on the successful completion of the Cadet advanced training program. You must present documentation to the school principal, who then arranged for the credit(s) to be recorded.

Note that Cadet credits are recognized only as additional credits beyond the minimum 30 credits required for high school graduation.

Course and Programming Designations
What do the codes at the end of course titles mean?

The Senior Years course designation codes are the numbers and letters that follow the course titles (e.g. Mathematics 10F or ELA: Comprehensive Focus 30S). The designation codes always contain three characters, indicating the grade level, who developed the course, and the purpose of the course. For more information, visit My Child in School.

What does the Modified (M) course designation mean?

If students have significant cognitive disabilities that do not allow them to meet the Manitoba curricular outcomes, even with supports, the number or content of the outcomes in a course will be changed to meet these students’ cognitive learning needs. The course will receive the modified (M) course designation.

What does English Additional Language (E) course designation mean?

Students in the early stages of English language learning can benefit from courses that primarily focus on English additional language learning goals within the context of a subject. These courses will receive the English Additional Language (E) course designation (e.g. Science 10E).

What does Individualized programming (I) designation mean?

Some student’s cognitive disabilities are so significant that they require learning outcomes that are individualized and different than the Manitoba curricular outcomes. These students receive individualized (I) programming, rather than taking specific courses.

Transfer Students
I am a high school student who moved to Manitoba from another Canadian province/territory. Can my non-Manitoba courses be accepted to meet Manitoba graduation requirements?

Students transferring to Manitoba’s school system as resident pupils should have their courses evaluated to determine whether Manitoba credit(s) can be granted. High school principals are responsible for making grade level placement decisions, and determining whether non-Manitoba course completions should receive Manitoba high school credits. For more information see the Evaluating Non-Manitoba Course Completions for Senior Years Credits document.

I am a high school student who moved to Manitoba from another country. Can my non-Manitoba educational credentials be accepted to meet Manitoba graduation requirements?

Students transferring to Manitoba’s school system as resident pupils should have their courses evaluated to determine whether Manitoba credit(s) can be granted. High school principals are responsible for making grade level placement decisions, and determining whether non-Manitoba course completions should receive Manitoba high school credits. For more information see the Evaluating Non-Manitoba Course Completions for Senior Years Credits document.

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Educators

Transfer Students
A student from another province/territory has transferred to my school. How do I evaluate the credits and place the student appropriately?

Students transferring to Manitoba’s school system as resident pupils should have their courses evaluated to determine whether Manitoba credit(s) can be granted. High school principals are responsible for making grade level placement decisions, and determining whether non-Manitoba course completions should receive Manitoba high school credits. For more information see the Evaluating Non-Manitoba Course Completions for Senior Years Credits document.

Summaries of provincial and territorial curricula and graduation requirements can be found on the Council of Ministers of Education (CMEC) website.

A homeschooled student has transferred to my school. How do I evaluate the student’s coursework and place the student appropriately.

The Homeschooling Office strongly recommends parents demonstrate what their children learned and how well they achieved the goals of their homeschooling program by providing samples of work collected over time to the receiving school.

High school principals are responsible for making grade level placement decisions, and determining whether non-Manitoba course completions should receive Manitoba high school credits. For more information see the Evaluating Non-Manitoba Course Completions for Senior Years Credits document.

A student from another country has transferred to my school. How do I evaluate the coursework and place the student appropriately?

Students transferring to Manitoba’s school system as resident pupils should have their courses evaluated to determine whether Manitoba credit(s) can be granted. High school principals are responsible for making grade level placement decisions, and determining whether non-Manitoba course completions should receive Manitoba high school credits. For more information see the Evaluating Non-Manitoba Course Completions for Senior Years Credits document.

Diplomas
What is the difference between a High School Diploma and a Mature Student Diploma?

The provincial High School Diploma requires the successful completion of 30 compulsory and optional credits across Grades 9 to 12.

The Mature Student Diploma is an alternative route to graduation available to students who meet the mature student eligibility requirements.

Can a school or school division make additional requirements beyond the provincial requirements of 30 credits for graduation?

Yes, a school or school division may mandate additional credits or requirements (e.g. community service) for graduation. Students meeting the additional requirements are eligible for the school/school division diploma, in addition to the provincial diploma. Students that do not meet the additional requirements, but do meet the provincial 30 credit requirement are eligible for the Manitoba high school diploma.

Can a student be granted two High School Diplomas?

Yes. A student can be granted two High School Diplomas, provided he/she meets the requirements of both diplomas.

Alternative Ways to Earn Credits
Can a student receive credit for speaking a language other than English and French?

Students proficient in languages other than French or English may earn up to four credits through the Special Language Credit Option.

Can a student receive a credit for achievement or participation in extracurricular or regular activities of organized community groups?

No. Specific examples of the types of extracurricular and community activities that do not qualify for credit are activities such as St. John Ambulance First Aid, CPR, 4H, athletic or artistic training/competition, driver education, coaching, volunteer fire fighting training, volunteer candy-striping, or participation in community cultural or leisure activities.

Can a student receive a credit for participating in community or cultural activities?

Yes. A student can earn a maximum of 1 credit for community service using the Community Service Student-initiated Projects (CSSIP) and 1 credit in cultural exploration using the Cultural Exploration Student-initiated Projects (CESIP). For more information, see Locally Developed Curricula: SICs and SIPs.

Can a student receive credit for completing the Cadet basic training program and the Cadet advanced training program?

Yes. One credit can be recognized on the successful completion of the Cadet basic training program, and one credit can be recognized on the successful completion of the Cadet advanced training program. You must present documentation to the school principal, who then arranged for the credit(s) to be recorded.

Note that Cadet credits are recognized only as additional credits beyond the minimum 30 credits required for high school graduation.

A student wants to take a distance learning course offered by another province. Can the student receive a Manitoba credit for that course?

As it is a non-Manitoba course, the principal is responsible determining whether the non-Manitoba course completion should receive a Manitoba high school credit. If accepted, the course would be recorded as a non-Manitoba credit with a grade of “S” for standing. For more information, see the Evaluating Non-Manitoba Course Completions for Senior Years Credits document.

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