Distance Learning

Independent Study Option

Social Studies

The Independent Study Option offers the following levels in Social Studies. Please list the Subject Code, Subject Designation, and the ISO Designation on the application to identify the course(s) required.

Course Name Subject Code Subject Designation ISO Designation
Grade 9 Canada in the Contemporary World (10F) 0101 10F 000
Grade 10 American History (20G) 0481 20G 002
Grade 10 Geographic Issues of the 21st Century (20F) 1180 20F 000
Grade 11 History of Canada (30F) 0105 30F 000
Grade 12 World Geography: A Human Perspective (40S) 1126 40S 002

Each listing of a subject name is followed by a unique 10-digit code made up of three parts:

  • Subject code. A 4-digit number that identifies each subject.
  • Subject designation. A 3-character code that identified the grade and level of a course.
  • ISO designation. A 3-digit number that identifies the course version.

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Grade 9 Canada in the Contemporary World (10F) 1 credit (2013)

Course Code 0101 10F 000

Class # 1376

Tutor/Marker: L. McPherson

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 3.19 MB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

This course explores Canada’s social, political and economic characteristics and how they are influenced by geographic and cultural diversity.  It also focuses on democracy, the role of the citizen in government, Canada’s role in the global village, and the country’s responsibilities and potential for leadership regarding current global issues. The course is structured as follows:
 

  • Module 1 – Diversity and Pluralism in Canada
  • Module 2 – Law, Order and Good Governance
  • Module 3 – Canada in the Global Context
  • Module 4 – Canada – Opportunities and Challenges

Evaluation is based on:

Assignments 60%
Midterm Exam (Modules 1 & 2) 20%
Final Exam (Modules 3 & 4) 20%
Total 100%

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

* If a hard copy is required, please contact the DLU.

Practice Exams and Answer Keys (also available in Blackboard)

Provided by the DLU

  • Canadians Living in the Global Village map

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Grade 10 American History (20G) 1 credit (2016)

Course Code 0481 20G 002

Class # 1510

Tutor/Marker: R. Garton

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 3.15 MB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

Note: Order your textbook today to ensure that you have a copy to start this course. The course cannot be completed without the textbook.
American History

In this course students will learn about a powerful country and Canada's closest neighbor, the United States. This course will help you understand

  • How the United States became the country that it is today
  • Why Canada and the United States are so different, and how they became that way
  • Our neighbours to the south, which will be very important to you in your personal and professional life
  • Why the United States is so influential and powerful

This course is organized around the following question for historical inquiry:

"Why is American history worth studying?"
Students will explore the history of the United States from pre-contact time (before Europeans arrived in North America) to the present. By the end of the course students will be able to respond to the questions for historical inquiry, will have learned historical thinking concepts and will be able to think historically. The textbook will provide all the course content and the course material provide the learning activities and assignments to be completed. The course is structured according to the units and chapters in your textbook.

  • Unit l: Early America
  • Unit ll: Revolutionary America
  • Unit lll: Nationalism and Sectionalism
  • Unit IV: Emerging Power
  • Unit V: World Power
  • Unit Vl: Connections to the Modern United States

Evaluation is based on:

Assignments 60%
(Each unit is equally weighted at 10% )
Midterm Exam (Units I-III) 20%
Final Exam (Units IV-VI) 20%
Total 100%

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

Practice Exams and Answer Keys

There are no practice exams for this course. The midterm and final exams are based on the following format:

Part 1 - True and False 20 marks
Part 2 - Fill-in-the-Blanks 20 marks
Part 3 - Multiple Choice 20 marks
Part 4 - Short Answer 20 marks
Part 5 - Long Answer (0 marks
Total Examination 100 marks

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

  • Carter, Finelli, Grant and Nagy. American History. Edmond Montgomery Publications Ltd.,
    2008. ISBN 978-1-55239-218-8 (Stock # 5444) MLRC

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Grade 10 Geographic Issues of the 21st Century (20F) 1 credit (2013)

Course Code 1180 20F 000

Class # 1367

Tutor/Marker: K. Blandford

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 1.14 MB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

This course explores the role Geography plays in our daily lives.  Geography helps people find their way around their neighborhood; buy clothes that suit anticipated changes in weather patterns; plan and pack for long driving and holiday trips. Geographic knowledge and skills can lead to a variety of exciting professions such as being a pilot, an urban planner, or a geologist! In this course students will have the opportunity to research; write personal reflections and essays, and use maps and mapping to gain a deeper understanding of our rapidly-changing world. The course is structured as follows:

  • Module 1: Geographic Literacy
  • Module 2: Natural Resources
  • Module 3: Food from the Land
  • Module 4: Industry and Trade
  • Module 5: Urban Places

Evaluation is based on:

Assignments 50%
Midterm Exam (Modules 1 & 2) 25%
Final Exam (Modules 3 - 5) 25%
Total 100%

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

Practice Exams and Answer Keys (also available in Blackboard)

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Grade 11 History of Canada (30F) 1 credit (2012)

Course Code 0105 30F 000

Class # 1410

Tutor/Marker: K. Dunlop

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 501 KB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

Note: Order your textbook today to ensure that you have a copy to start this course.

Shaping Canada

This course will investigate the History of Canada from pre-contact time to the present. The course guides students through the Shaping Canada textbook that was written specifically for Manitoba. The authors and contributors provide the Manitoban and Canadian historical perspectives that enable students to reflect and respond to the question How has Canada's history shaped the Canada of today?

The textbook will provide all the course content and the course materials provide the learning activities and assignments to be completed after working through the clusters and chapters. The course is structured according to the five clusters as outlined in the Shaping Canada textbook.

  • Cluster 1: First People and Nouvelle-France (before 1763)
  • Cluster 2: British North America (1763 to 1867)
  • Cluster 3: Becoming a Sovereign Nation (1867 to 1931)
  • Cluster 4: Achievements and Challenges (1931 to 1982)
  • Cluster 5: Defining Contemporary Canada (1982 to present)

Evaluation is based on:

Assignments 60%
Midterm Exam (Modules 1 - 3) 20%
Final Exam (Modules 4 - 5) 20%
Total 100%

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

Practice Exams and Answer Keys (also available in Blackboard)

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

  • Connor, Hull and Wyatt-Anderson. Shaping Canada. McGraw-Hill Ryerson Limited, 2011. (Stock # 10391) MLRC

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Grade 12 World Geography: A Human Perspective (40S) 1 credit (2015)

Course Code 1126 40S 002

Class # 1503

Tutor/Marker: R. Garton

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 1.28 MB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

What is “a human perspective” with regard to world geography? The short answer is that it is the study of the relationship between people and their physical surroundings. The long answer is that it is an in-depth study of the humankind's relationship with Earth and how human activities impact Earth, and the challenges now faced in dealing with the aftermath of those activities.

This course outlines the challenges facing the world today. Module 1 begins with an overview of world geography. Module 2-5 each explore a specific aspect of world geography from a human perspective and how that aspect is connected on a global level. In Module 6, the underlying theme of world interdependence that runs through each module is brought to the forefront. 

The course reviews the major world challenges and demonstrates how those challenges are connected, not only globally in a physical sense, but also to each other, and how they are all connected to, and have an impact on the environment. 

This course contains a number of images that are best viewed in colour. Colour versions of these images in PDF format are available in Blackboard Learn. Registered students are issued a username and password at the time of registration. If Internet access is unavailable, a CD with these images is available upon request from the Distance Learning Unit.

  • Module 1: World Geography Overview
  • Module 2: World Population: Characteristics, Distribution, and Growth
  • Module 3: World Food Supply: Production and Distribution
  • Module 4: World Resources, Energy, and the Environment
  • Module 5: World Industrialization and Urbanization
  • Module 6: World Interdependence

Evaluation is based on:

Assignments 50%
(Each module is weighted at 8 or 8.5%)
Midterm Exam (Modules 1 - 3) 25%
Final Exam (Modules 4 - 6) 25%
Total 100%

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Suggested

  • Current Atlas

Access Online

Practice Exams and Answer Keys

There are no practice exams for this course. The midterm and final exams are based on the following format:

Part A - True or False (15 marks)
Part B - Multiple Choice (15 marks)
Part C - Matching (10 marks)
Part D - Definitions and Connections (25 marks)
Part E - Short Answer (15 marks)
Part F - Long Answer (20 marks)
Total Examination (100 marks)

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