Distance Learning

Independent Study Option

English Language Arts

The study of the English Language Arts enables students to understand and appreciate language, and to use it confidently and competently in a variety of situations for communication, personal satisfaction, and learning. The Independent Study Option offers the following courses in English Language Arts. Please list the Subject Code, Subject Designation, and the ISO Designation on the application to identify the course(s) required.

Course Name Subject Code Subject Designation ISO Designation
Grade 9 English Language Arts (10F) 0001 10F 003
Grade 10 English Language Arts (20F) 0001 20F 002
Grade 11 English Language Arts: Comprehensive Focus (30S) 0092 30S 001
Grade 11 English Language Arts: Transactional Focus (30S) 0094 30S 002
Grade 12 English Language Arts: Comprehensive Focus (40S) 0092 40S 002
Grade 12 English Language Arts: Transactional Focus (40S) 0094 40S 001

Each listing of a subject name is followed by a unique 10-digit code made up of three parts:

  • Subject code. A 4-digit number that identifies each subject.
  • Subject designation. A 3-character code that identifies the grade and level of a course.
  • ISO designation. A 3-digit number that identifies the course version.

What are the differences between Comprehensive and Transactional ELA courses?

There are two different Grade 11 and Grade 12 English Language Arts courses: Comprehensive Focus and Transactional Focus. Each course has a distinct focus, equally challenging, and engages the student in a variety of learning experiences that aim to satisfy all the English Language Arts General/Specific learning outcomes.

The Comprehensive Focus course places equal emphasis on working with texts for pragmatic (50%) and for aesthetic (50%) purposes.

The Transactional Focus course places more emphasis on working with texts for pragmatic purposes (70%) than for aesthetic (30%) purposes.

What are aesthetic and pragmatic purposes?

The differences between aesthetic and pragmatic purposes can be illustrated by looking at taking a walk for fun versus walking to get somewhere:

  • Walking for aesthetic purposes could include listening to the birds sing, checking out your neighbour's yard work, smelling the lilacs, and so on. Generally, you take your time and appreciate various aspects of the experience. You are fully conscious of how it feels to stretch your muscles and breathe in the fresh air.
  • On the other hand, if you are walking for pragmatic purposes , for example, in order to get to school or work, you probably walk more quickly and pay more attention to obstacles such as puddles to walk around than to whether the trees are budding yet. You probably would walk more automatically, thinking of things such as your plans for the day, rather than revelling in how good it feels to stretch your muscles. Of course, there is nothing to stop you from enjoying your walk, that is, from combining aesthetic and pragmatic purposes.

When engaging with text for aesthetic and pragmatic purposes the differences are:

  • When you engage with a text for aesthetic purposes, you expect to take pleasure in being in the world of that text, and will take time to appreciate various aspects of the craft and overall experience. You may, view a film, read a novel, or listen to a song in order to understand peoples' feelings, vision, and/or experiences.

  • When you engage with a text for pragmatic purposes, you expect to take some knowledge and information from the text, and so you value clarity-that is, you want to express ideas clearly and directly and to be organized and formatted in such a way that you can easily find what you need. You may read a newspaper and view television commercials to become more informed about current events, products, or issues so that you can make decisions.

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Grade 9 English Language Arts (10F) 1 credit (2016)

Course Code 0001 10F 003

Class # 1521

Tutor/Marker: T. Schneider

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 1.21 KB)
Instructions for Submitting Audio Samples (Adobe Icon 20 KB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

In this course, you will have the opportunity to read short stories, poems, non-fiction works and novels. You will also view visual works. Besides reading and viewing the works of others, you will be writing, representing, and speaking about those works and your own creations. in Manitoba, English language arts students read, write, speak, listen, view and represent to:

  • Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
  • Comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print, and other media texts
  • Manage ideas and information
  • Enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
  • Celebrate and build community

The course is divided into 8 Sequences:

  • Sequence 1: Getting to Know You
  • Sequence 2: Getting to Know Others
  • Sequence 3: The Conflicts in Our Lives
  • Sequence 4: From Blogs to Zines
  • Midterm Progress Test
  • Sequence 5: Longer Works of Fiction or Non-Fiction
  • Sequence 6: Heroes in the Real and Imaginary World
  • Sequence 7: Media Literacy
  • Sequence 8: The Showcase Portfolio

Evaluation is based on:

Assignments (9 assignments) 85%
Midterm Progress Test 15%
Total 100%

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

The midterm progress test is worth 15% of your final course mark. Students are allowed 2 hours to complete the test. Students will be provided with the theme for the test and a "Readings and Before and During Reading Activities" booklet to complete prior to the test. There will be no time during the test to complete the readings and activities.

A list of the reference books and textbooks you need for this course follows. These texts may be available for loan at your local school or community library. Alternately, they may be purchased from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre (LRC) (formerly the Manitoba Text Book Bureau) (MTBB) or a supplier of your choice.

RESOURCES

Access Online

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

Required

  • Alice Barlow-Kedves at al SightLines 9. (Stock # 7702) MLRC
  • Robert Dawe et al. ResourceLines 9/10. (Stock # 7703) MLRC

Choose one book from the following list of non-fiction and one book from the list of novel titles

Non-Fiction (Select One)

  • Karen Blumenthal. Steve Jobs: The Man Who Thought Different.
  • Anne Frank. Anne Frank: the Diary of a Young Girl. (Stock # 21116) MLRC
  • Theodore Fontaine. Broken Circle. (Stock # 15717) MLRC
  • Wayne Gretzky (with Rick Reilly). Gretzky: An Autobiography.
  • Mariatu Kamara (Susan McLelland). The Bite of the Mango. (Stock # 15232) MLRC
  • Leslie Scrivener. Terry Fox: His Story.
  • Hayley Wickenheiser. Gold Medal Diary.

Novels (Select One)

  • Robert Cormier. The Chocolate War. (Stock # 7588) MLRC
  • William Bell. Forbidden City. (Stock # 21151) MLRC
  • Beth Goobie. The Lottery. (Stock # 2767) MLRC
  • Suzanne Martel. The King's Daughter. (Stock # 21186) MLRC
  • Ouida Sebestyen. Words by Heart. (Stock # 21216) MLRC

Suggested

  • Peter Sebranak et al. Writers Inc: A Student's Handbook for Writing and Learning. (Stock # 72090) MLRC
  • Recommended text: Gage Canadian School Thesaurus (Stock # 6206) MLRC
  • Recommended text: Gage Canadian Dictionary (Stock # 6204) MLRC

Audio/Video Recording Equipment

  • In Assignment 7.1 you will have the option of making an audio or video recording of your assignment and submitting it to your tutor/marking for assessment. There are other choices available for this assignment that does not require recording equipment.

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Grade 10 English Language Arts (20F) 1 credit (2016)

Course Code 0001 20F 002

Class # 1524

Tutor/Marker: K. Dunlop

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 767 KB)
Instructions for Submitting Audio Samples (Adobe Icon 17 KB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

In this course, you will have the opportunity to read short stories, poems, non-fiction works and novels. You will also listen to audio performances and view visual works. Besides reading and viewing the works of others, you will be writing, representing, and speaking about those works and your own creations. In Manitoba, English language arts students read, write, speak, listen, view and represent to:

  • Explore thoughts, ideas, feelings, and experiences
  • Comprehend and respond personally and critically to oral, print, and other media texts
  • Manage ideas and information
  • Enhance the clarity and artistry of communication
  • Celebrate and build community

The course is divided into 8 Sequences

  • Sequence 1: Starting with Yourself as a Learner
  • Sequence 2: Introducing Yourself to Others
  • Sequence 3: Significant People in Your Life - The Influences of Parents
  • Midterm Exam
  • Sequence 4: Finding Yourself and Your Place in the Word (Literary Focus)
  • Sequence 5: The Many Forces That Influence People - Novel Study
  • Sequence 6: More Influential Factors in Our Lives - How the Values of Friends and Peers Affect Us (Transactional Focus)
  • Sequence 7: Changemakers of Today - People Who Influence Our World
  • Sequence 8: The Showcase Portfolio

Evaluation is based on:

Assignments (10 assignments) 85%
Midterm Progress Test 15%
Total 100%

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

The midterm progress test is worth 15% of your final course mark. Students are allowed 2 hours to complete the test. Students will be provided with the theme for the test and a booklet of Readings, as well as a Before and During Reading Activities Booklet to complete prior to the test. There will be no time during the test to complete the readings and activities.

A list of the reference books and textbooks you need for this course follows. These texts may be available for loan at your local school or community library. Alternately, they may be purchased from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre (LRC) (formerly the Manitoba Text Book Bureau) (MTBB) or a supplier of your choice.

RESOURCES

Access Online

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

Required

  • Crane, Mary, Barbara Fullerton, and Amanda Joseph, eds. SightLines 10. (Stock # 8241) MLRC
  • Dawe, Robert, Barry Duncan, and Wendy Mathieu. ResourceLines 9/10. (Stock # 7703) MLRC

Choose one book from the following list of novel titles

  • Beatrice Culleton Mosionier. April Raintree. (Stock # 21382) MLRC
  • Joanne Greenberg. I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. (Stock # 3449) MLRC
  • Ernest Hemingway. The Old Man and the Sea. (Stock # 21418) MLRC
  • Daniel Keyes. Flowers for Algernon. (Stock # 21395) MLRC
  • Harper Lee. To Kill a Mockingbird. (Stock # 10392 or 7586) MLRC
  • John Steinbeck. Of Mice and Men. (Stock # 21415) MLRC

Suggested

  • Peter Sebranak et al. Writers Inc: A Student's Handbook for Writing and Learning. (Stock # 72090) MLRC
  • Recommended text: Gage Canadian School Thesaurus. (Stock # 6206) MLRC
  • Recommended text: Gage Canadian Dictionary. (Stock # 6204) MLRC

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Grade 11 English Language Arts: Comprehensive Focus (30S) 1 credit (2007)

Course Code 0092 30S 001

Class # 1417

Tutor/Marker: A. Kowalski

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 722 KB)
What are the differences between the two ELA courses? (Adobe Icon 116 KB)
Instructions for Submitting Audio Samples (Adobe Icon 17 KB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

This course will assist with the language development of Grade 11 students. The emphasis of this course is 50% pragmatic/practical and 50% aesthetic/reflective. Students explore the use of language for pragmatic purposes: to inform, direct, persuade, plan, analyze, and explain. They also engage with and use language for aesthetic purposes: personally connecting with the text, developing deeper insights, and responding thoughtfully to the ideas and topics presented. Some of the learning experiences include: designing a promotional pamphlet, composing a self-portrait, conducting an interview, writing a multigenre paper, creating a formal report and a portfolio. The course is structured as follows:

  • Sequence 1: My Expectations
  • Sequence 2: Reader’s Expectations
  • Sequence 3: Writer’s Expectations
  • Sequence 4: Family Expectations
  • Sequence 5: Societal/Cultural Expectations, Part 1
  • Sequence 6: Societal/Cultural Expectations, Part 2
  • Sequence 7: “Living Up to Expectations”

Each sequence contains lessons that lead to the successful completion of a learning experience and assignment(s). At the end of each sequence, students are required to submit all the work from that sequence, including the assignment(s). Both the student and the Tutor/Marker assess assignment processes and products.

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

* If a hard copy is required, please contact the DLU.

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

Required

  • Laden, N. Private I. Guana: The Case of the Missing Chameleon (Stock # 8655) MLRC
  • Laurence, Margaret. A Bird in the House (Stock # 12684) MLRC
  • Sebranek, Patrick, Meyer, Verne, and Kemper, Dave. Writers INC: A Student Handbook for Writing and Learning. Wilmington, MA: Write Source, 2001. (Stock # 72090) MLRC

Choose one play from the following:

  • A Doll’s House (Stock # 21528) MLRC
  • The Importance of Being Earnest (Stock # 21542) MLRC

Choose one novel from the following list:

  • Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451 (Stock # 21587) MLRC
  • Braithwaite, Max. The Night We Stole the Mountie’s Car (Stock # 21598) MLRC
  • Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World (Stock # 5359) MLRC
  • Lowry, Lois. The Giver (Stock # 8681) MLRC
  • Waugh, Evelyn. The Loved One (Stock # 21594) MLRC

Choose one picture book from the following list:

  • Martin, Rafe. The Rough-Face Girl (Stock # 8679) MLRC
  • Steptoe, John. Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters (Stock # 8680) MLRC

Suggested

  • Gage Canadian Dictionary (Stock # 6204) MLRC
  • Gage Canadian Thesaurus (Stock # 10428) MLRC

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Grade 11 English Language Arts: Transactional Focus (30S)1 credit (2007)

Course Code 0094 30S 002

Class # 858

Tutor/Marker: A. Kowalski

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 873 KB)
What are the differences between the two ELA courses? (Adobe Icon 116 KB)
Instructions for Submitting Audio Samples (Adobe Icon 17 KB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

This course will assist with the language development of Grade 11 students. The emphasis of this course is 70% pragmatic/practical and 30% aesthetic/reflective. In order to meet the learning outcomes, students will engage with and compose texts primarily to gain information or discern another point of view, to compare and weigh ideas, to argue a case, and to conduct daily transactions. Pragmatic communication is audience-specific; as speakers, writers, and representers, they learn to express themselves clearly, logically, and with an intended effect. Some of the learning experiences include: creating a zine, designing a pamphlet, recording an oral presentation, producing an advertisement, and creating a portfolio. The course is structured as follows:

  • Sequence 1: Getting Acquainted
  • Sequence 2: Advertising
  • Sequence 3: From Fiction to Fact: Self-Directed Inquiry
  • Sequence 4: Television
  • Sequence 5: Messages in the Workplace
  • Sequence 6: Samples and Reflections (Portfolio)

Each sequence contains lessons that lead to the successful completion of a learning experience and assignment(s). At the end of each sequence, students are required to submit all the work from that sequence, including the assignment(s). Both the student and the Tutor/Marker assess assignment processes and products. Students will be required to record an oral presentation and a speech in audio form, as well as a conversation with their learning partner. Students are required to write a midterm progress test (after Sequence 3). The test is 4 hours, written in two-2 hour sessions.

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

Required

  • Sebranek, Patrick, Meyer, Verne and Kemper, Dave. Writers INC: A Student Handbook for Writing and Learning. Wilmington, MA: Write Source, 2001. (Stock # 72090) MLRC

Choose one book from the following list:

  • Bradbury, Ray. Fahrenheit 451 (Stock # 21587) MLRC
  • Callaghan, Morley. Such is My Beloved (Stock # 6158) MLRC
  • Camus, Albert. The Plague (Stock # 21874) MLRC
  • Fitzgerald, F. Scott. The Great Gatsby (Stock # 21588) MLRC
  • Hershey, John. Hiroshima (Stock # 21511) MLRC
  • Huxley, Aldous. Brave New World (Stock # 5359) MLRC
  • Kogawa, Joy. Obasan (Stock # 21603) MLRC
  • Marlyn, John. Under the Ribs of Death (Stock # 15076) MLRC
  • Orwell, George. Animal Farm (Stock # 21570) MLRC
  • Shields, Carol. The Stone Diaries (Stock # 21615) MLRC
  • Waugh, Evelyn. The Loved One (Stock # 21594) MLRC
    or
  • Student's own choice approved by Tutor/Marker.

Suggested

  • Gage Canadian Dictionary (Stock # 6204) MLRC
  • Gage Canadian Thesaurus (Stock # 10428) MLRC

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Grade 12 English Language Arts: Comprehensive Focus (40S) 1 credit (2007)

Course Code 0092 40S 002

Class # 855

Tutor/Marker: M. Donais

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 1.06 MB)
What are the differences between the two ELA courses? (Adobe Icon 116 KB)
Instructions for Submitting Audio Samples (Adobe Icon 17 KB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

This course will assist with the language development of Grade 12 students. The emphasis of this course is 50% pragmatic/practical and 50% aesthetic/reflective. As listeners, readers, and viewers, students will recall, paraphrase, and analyse pragmatic texts, and respond to and interpret aesthetic literature. This course provides students with multiple opportunities to engage with and produce a variety of texts, some of the learning experiences include: planning and presenting a campaign, writing a multigenre paper, producing a news broadcast, and designing a portfolio. The course is structured as follows:

  • Sequence 1: Using Language to Delight
  • Sequence 2: Using Language to Inform
  • Sequence 3: Using Language to Experiment and Extend
  • Sequence 3A: Using Language to Persuade
    or
  • Sequence 3B: Using language to Challenge
  • Sequence 4: Using Language to Manipulate
  • Sequence 5: Using Language to Share and Celebrate

Each sequence contains lessons that lead to the successful completion of a learning experience and assignment(s). At the end of each sequence, students are required to submit all the work from that sequence, including the assignment(s). Both the student and the Tutor/Marker assess assignment processes and products. There is also a requirement to write a midterm progress test (after Sequence 2). The test is 4 hours, written in two-2 hour sessions.

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

* If a hard copy is required, please contact the DLU.

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

Required

  • Orwell, George. Nineteen Eighty-four (Stock # 21861) MLRC
  • Sebranek, Patrick, Meyer, Verne and Kemper, Dave. Writers INC: A Student Handbook for Writing and Learning. Wilmington, MA: Write Source, 2001. (Stock # 72090) MLRC
  • Sendak, Maurice. Where the Wild Things Are. Harper Collin Publishers, 1991 (Stock # 8979) MLRC
  • Wiesner, David. Tuesday. New York: Clarion Books, 1991 (Stock # 8980) MLRC

Suggested

  • Gage Canadian Dictionary (Stock # 6204) MLRC
  • Gage Canadian Thesaurus (Stock # 10428) MLRC

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Grade 12 English Language Arts: Transactional Focus (40S) 1 credit (2007)

Course Code 0094 40S 001

Class # 821

Tutor/Marker: K. Robinson

Course Preview (Adobe Icon 976 KB)
What are the differences between the two ELA courses? (Adobe Icon 116 KB)
Instructions for Submitting Audio Samples (Adobe Icon 17 KB)

2017-2018 Student Course Fees (Adobe Icon 102 KB)

This course will assist with the language development of Grade 12 students. The emphasis of this course is 70% pragmatic/practical and 30% aesthetic/reflective.  The Transactional Focus stresses the pragmatic uses of language: language that informs, directs, plans, persuades, analyzes, argues, and explains.  This course is designed for those students who wish to work with and create non-fictional materials.  The overall theme of this course is “influences”; students will explore and reflect on significant people, communities, and places/events that have helped shape their lives.  Students will have the opportunity to: create their own biopic, pre-pare and conduct interviews, write a tribute, report, and reflective essay, and design a portfolio. It is structured as follows:

  • Sequence 1: Influences and Self
  • Sequence 2: Influences and Other
  • Sequence 3: Local and Global Community Influences
  • Sequence 4: Reminiscences
  • Sequence 5: Using Language to Share and Celebrate (Portfolio)

Each sequence contains lessons that lead to the successful completion of a learning experience and assignment(s). At the end of each sequence, students are required to submit all the work from that sequence, including the assignment(s).  Both the student and the Tutor/Marker assess assignment processes and products. Students will be required to record an oral presentation and a speech in audio form, as well as a conversation with their learning partner. There is also a requirement to write a midterm progress test (after Sequence 2). The test is 4 hours, written in two 2 hour sessions.

All assignments must be attempted, a minimum mark of 40% is required on all supervised pieces of assessment (midterm and final exam), and an overall final mark of 50% or greater must be obtained in order for the Distance Learning Unit to issue a final mark.

RESOURCES

Access Online

* If a hard copy is required, please contact the DLU.

Purchase from the Manitoba Learning Resource Centre

Required

  • Sebranek, Patrick, Meyer, Verne and Kemper, Dave. 2001.
    Writers INC: A Student Handbook for Writing and Learning. Wilmington, MA: Write Source, 2001. (Stock # 72090) MLRC

Choose one memoir from the following list:

(Note: The beginning of each of these memoirs is included in the Text section at the end of Sequence 4 for the students to read before making their selection)

  • Albom, Mitch. Tuesdays with Morrie (Stock # 9323) MLRC
  • Gildener, Catherine. Too Close to the Falls (Stock # 9324) MLRC
  • McCourt, Frank. Angela's Ashes: A Memoir (Stock # 8688) MLRC
  • Mezlekia, Nega. Notes from the Hyena's Belly: Memories of My Ethiopian Boyhood (Stock # 8684) MLRC
  • Toews, Miriam. Swing Low: A Life (Stock # 8686) MLRC (reprint)

Suggested

  • Gage Canadian Dictionary (Stock # 6204) MLRC
  • Gage Canadian Thesaurus (Stock # 10428) MLRC

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