Government of Manitoba
Manitoba
Children play with Lego on a colourful alphabet rug. A boy who is visually impaired reads a book with raised dots, a precursor to learning to read in Braille. Sand running through the hourglasses fascinates a curious boy. A boy building with blocks greets the class bunny who has hopped over for a visit. A boy gives a thumbs up. A girl plays with colourful shapes on the classroom light-table. A girl counts and orders buttons by size. Two girls balance on a pipe as they look for frogs in a swampy area. Children create their own book illustrations using the “still life” technique. Two girls are paired during a large group activity. A boy builds with interlocking cubes. A girl illustrates her “story”. Three girls practice their letters on individual whiteboards. A boy holds alphabet blocks that spell out PLAY. Young boys explore classroom science materials. A girl using a walker smiles. Three children share a book together." An educator and 4 preschoolers enjoy a small group interaction.

"To enter into a style of teaching which is based on questioning what we’re doing and why, on listening to children, on thinking about how theory is translated into practice and how practice informs theory, is to enter into a way of working where professional development takes place day after day in the classroom."
Shonya Shoptaugh

An Action Plan for Science Education in Manitoba

Early Childhood Education

For Educators

Professional Learning Opportunities

Book these workshops for a time and place that is convenient to your early learning team. We come to you--no charge. Sessions are generally full day in-services but may be adapted for shorter or longer timeframes.  

Sessions like these are also available periodically at the Department of Education and Training. Please visit the Workshop Registration System to see currently available sessions.


ABC’s and 123’s of DAP

A girl counts on the abacus.This workshop about developmentally appropriate practice (DAP) highlights the work of some major child development theorists and key early childhood approaches as well as:

  • 3 core considerations for DAP
  • 12 principles of child development
  • 5 guidelines for effective teaching
  • 10 suggested teaching strategies
  • Literacy and Numeracy in DAP classrooms

Growing Readers and Writers

A boy finds the letters of his name.What does early literacy development look like?

What does it mean to be intentional about literacy in your classroom?

How do early educators support children’s emerging interest in reading and writing by using developmentally appropriate instructional practices?

Through a child-centred approach, with time for reflections, conversations, goal setting, and some hands-on fun, learn about:

  • the development of literacy skills needed by preschool children for successful transition to Kindergarten;
  • how to build on those skills during the Kindergarten year and meet the English language arts curriculum learning outcomes; and
  • how to create a print-rich, playful learning environment that encourages children’s language, reading, drawing, and writing
  • which teaching strategies best support children’s literacy development at home, school, or other early learning sites.

Growing Mathematicians

Children count their snack items onto a ten-frame.What does early numeracy development look like?

What does it mean to be intentional about numeracy in your playroom?

How do early educators support young children’s emerging interest in numeracy by using developmentally appropriate instructional practices?

Through a child-centred approach, with time for reflections, conversations, goal setting, and some hands-on fun, learn about:

  • the development of numeracy skills needed by preschool children for successful transition to Kindergarten; 
  • how to build on those skills during the Kindergarten year and support the mathematics curriculum learning outcomes children experience in school; 
  • how to create a rich and playful learning environment that encourages children’s counting, sorting, matching, comparing, measuring, patterning and building of shapes; and
  • which teaching strategies best support children’s numeracy development at home, child care or other early learning sites, and at school.

Play with Purpose

Two girls balance on a pipe as they look for frogs in a swampy area.How do intentional teachers meet Kindergarten curricular outcomes while remaining true to the science about how young children learn best? Which educational strategies are most powerful?

  • play/curriculum integration  offers your children authentic opportunities to practice and refine important skills and concepts;
  • inquiry learning responds to children’s interests and helps you to differentiate your teaching approach;
  • you can guide learning through rich, experiential activities; and
  • how play-generated curriculum emerges from your responsiveness to children’s own interests and inquiries.

Play for Principals

This special half day session for school administrators and leaders provides the context for the recommendations around play-based learning in Kindergarten by sharing

  • the evidence base behind play-based learning and developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) in early education
  • an overview of the Kindergarten Support Document, A Time for Learning, A Time for Joy
  • a closer look at numeracy and literacy through play
  • how to support change and develop a play-based learning action plan for your school(s)

Playing in the Same Sandbox

This special half day session is for leaders of child care programs and schools who are interested in building alliances for children. Dig down deep and come out on the other side with some takeaway strategies for building bridges with allies in the Early Childhood Development community.
Some of the topics to be explored include:

  • What are the strengths inherent in each other’s approach? What do you have in common? Where are the rough spots?
  • What are some ways to ease into a relationship?
  • What do you need to know (Curriculum? Systems?)
  • What needs smoothing? Special needs;  alignment and continuity of curriculum; transitions for children; communicating during conflict;  
  • What do you wish they knew? How can you tell them?
  • What is the shared vision for young learners in your community?

For more information about these workshops and how to bring these to your school or community, please contact:

Debra Mayer
Early Childhood Consultant
Telephone: 204-945-3120
Toll free: 1-800-282-8069, ext. 3120
Email: debra.mayer@gov.mb.ca